Archive for legal

NAKED REDHEAD & Ridiculous Rant

Posted in erotic, fashion, fetish, FLICKR, lingerie, photographers, PHOTOGRAPHY, pinup, Sexy, women with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 24, 2013 by cliffmichaels

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I read somewhere there’s fairly solid evidence there are actually brain differences between conservatives and liberals. I believe it. Forgive my obvious bias, but it seems to me conservatives have – at least now – a harder time connecting to reality. Not that we liberals don’t have a difficult time seeing past our preconceived notions as well. It’s a matter of degree and not in kind.

Still, for the most part liberals accept science as a guide to reality. The evidence for climate change and evolution is overwhelming. Many, if not most, conservatives are immune to scientific persuasion (unless, of course, they think some particular discovery supports their mindset) and claim both “theories” are merely products of left wing pseudo science created to deprive us of our freedoms.  Its all a conspiracy, don’t you know…

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This is a detour, but I wonder how people – conservatives, in this case –  can believe in a conspiracy that would require thousands  of evildoers to act in concert. Try to figure out just how such a massive deceit would work. It wouldn’t; it would be impossible to coordinate without leaving a massive paper trail, not to mention scores of  defectors who would expose the fraud. Of course, our more rational conservative  brothers would claim scientists are led astray by groupthink. Why such an overwhelming number of climate scientists believe in man made climate change, however, is never explained (or why the overwhelming majority of biologists, geneticists, geologists, etc., etc. accept evolution as a solid scientific answer to why animal and plant life – and we – are the way we are). Is it just coincidence? Each scientist one morning decided to believe in climate change despite the obviousness (conservatives say) of it being wrong. It always amazes me climate change deniers will take some obvious fact – there’s a glacier in South America that grew in size – and argue climate change therefore i wrong. As if scientists didn’t know about it, or willfully refused to believe it.

Years ago I was in Atlantic City and did a bit of gambling. I had a sudden brainstorm and came up with a surefire way to win at roulette. My idea was to double any red or black bet I lost but pocket my winnings. Say I bet ten dollars on each spin on black. If I win I put the sawbuck in my pocket, then bet another ten. Should I lose I next bet twenty. If I lose again I bet forty… My losing streak will end when I win and I’ll break even over the losing streak once I win. If I win my next bet I once more pocket my winnings.

Can’t lose! I’ll be rich!

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Well, no. I knew my theory had to be wrong. Surely someone – shortly after the invention of roulette – would have thought of my plan and bankrupted the casino and ended roulette as we know it. I was right. There is something called the law of large numbers which would eventually destroy me. Sooner or later I’d hit a long losing streak that would be impossible for me to survive. Suppose, for instance, I lost thirteen bets in a row with a starting bet of twenty dollars. On the fourteenth bet I’d have to wager $82,000 to break even. Run the losing streak to twenty-five and my break even bet must be approximately $168,000,000. I don’t know about you, but I don’t normally carry that kind of cash around.

Sure the odds of a twenty-five bet losing streak is quite low – but sooner or later a losing streak will come along that bankrupts you. Even a string of ten losses – betting ten bucks initially – will require an eleventh bet of more than ten thousand dollars (make the streak  eleven and now you need more than twenty grand to just break even – twelve requires forty).

This digression seems to me to have some relevance to the way conservatives think. When faced with something the want to disbelieve they latch onto some simple set of facts – true or false – they  claim proves the provocative theory false. It was warmer in the past. It’s just sunspots. Glaciers in Asia are actually growing. Carbon dating is wrong. The human eye is too complex to have been the product of  natural selection. Etc. Etc. Etc.

Manmade global warming is overwhelmingly supported by scientific evidence and enjoys the support of a very high majority of climatologists and other scientists. More and more the theory is refined and alarming evidence continues to rolls in. The same is true of the theory of evolution. No major scientific study has proven Darwin’s original insights wrong. Tens of thousands of discoveries in the fields of biology, paleontology, genetics, geology, molecular biology, physics,  and countless  other scientific disciplines have been consistent with the theory.

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Conservatives, for the most part, are able to ignore the avalanche of evidence underpinning both scientific theories. They offer simplistic rebuttals: the planet was warmer in the past, the human eye is too complex to have evolved by random chance. Glaciers in Asia are getting bigger, carbon dating is wrong.

You can’t argue with them. Studies show the more educated a conservative is the more she believes the scientific consensus in climatology and biology is wrong. A little learning is a dangerous thing. The educated right winger more easily embraces the pseudosciences of  denial.

Another digression… You cannot convince a Indian shaman his rain dance doesn’t work. If he does the dance and it rains it proves, of course, his high steppin’ worked. If it doesn’t, and you say, “see, I told you it didn’t work!” he just smiles and assures you he just didn’t do the dance right. To the shaman his rain dance always works so long as h
e manages to gyrate in proper precision. How does he know he hoofed without fault? It rains, of course. See also superstition, random reinforcement and religion.

Sure, we lefties are not immune. We, too, see what we want to see all to often. We too easily favor public policies because their goals are, to us, noble and pure. We too easily forget government, particularly at the federal level, is horribly inefficient and subject to corruption and the rule of unintended consequences. Our guys are wonderful (he was set up – she seduced him – he didn’t really mean any harm…) Their guys are bastards (he set them up – he seduced her (him) – he meant to do real harm). We see our leaders virtues, we too often deny their faults. Obama’s embrace of most of Bush’s draconian security practices is too easily excused.

But we don’t do it as often. We are more willing to accept science even when it contradicts our beliefs. We are more willing to learn, to investigate facts that make us realize we have been wrong. As Andrew Sullivan quotes George Orwell: To see what’s in front of one’s nose needs a constant struggle. “Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts,” attributed to Daniel Patrick Moynihan, also comes to mind.

Anyway, that’s my opinion but I could be wrong…

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Photos by swo81, all subject to this creative commons license Click image for details

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Stripper Kitties!

Posted in fetish, FLICKR, history, photographers, PHOTOGRAPHY, politics, religion, sexual with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 24, 2013 by cliffmichaels

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Let’s face this sad fact: Visions is a tawdry sex blog. It’s true. No matter how many high minded posts we upload about culture or politics, the smutty pics and stories are what draw hits. We know it. You know it. Hell, even Bob Doles knows it!

There are, as you surely know, lots – and I mean Big Lots – of sex blogs on the ‘net. Sex is either the most popular topic in the History of the world or in the top three – food & death being the other two (except in England, where sex is replaced by gardening).

Here’s a sex blog I’ve discovered: Tits and Sass. T&S can best be described as a serious journal written by sex workers – strippers and hookers, mostly. More than forty contributors are listed. Here’s what the site says about itself:

Tits and Sass is a group blog run by sex workers who saw a void when it came to witty commentary on the public image of our industry. The ideas promoted about us in the public eye have an impact on the realities of our lives as sex workers every bit as strong as the law, so we’re not letting any more dead hooker or stripper bones jokes pass by without comment.

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Visions spends much of the time wallowing in ignorance and had no clue the was a vibrant community of literate – and politicly active – positive sex workers. Here are links to some of the more serious T&S posts: Sex Work and Storytelling at “Sex and Justice”License to Pimp: A Conversation with Filmmaker Hima B.Stripper Shot At Strip Club Denied Worker’s Comp. If you doubt a sexblog can be deadly earnest, here’s a “quote of the day”:

The TERF [trans-exclusionary radical feminist] is obsessed with dividing feminism at all costs and commenting negatively on women’s sexuality. sex-shaming is a historical patriarchal tool to remind those of us who are women of the position the patriarchy wants us to hold: inferior.  the TERF is loud about sex work being evil, ignoring that for many trans people and for many people of color, sex work is the only work there is. (emphasis in original)

But, hey, Visions doesn’t really care when it comes to serious sex stuff about the intersection of sex work and  politics, law, culture, or feminism. We are just looking for some quick and mindless fun. We found it! There appears to be a continuing feature on T&S, Stacks & Cats: photos of sex workers’ cats with stacks of their (earned) cash. Check them out here, here, and here.

Flickr Groups: Hookers, Whores and Whorehouses , Porn Stars & Strippers

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Photo credits: click top image for cat; cash: both – and remix – subject to this CC license. For bottom two images, click for credit and cc license.

 

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You’re Kidding Me, Right!?

Posted in FLICKR, history, photographers, PHOTOGRAPHY, politics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 12, 2013 by cliffmichaels

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Idiocy on Parade


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If only we’d known… Slavery could have been avoided in America if blacks had possessed firearms in 1776.

“We are looking for a peaceful protest,” Ward said. Continuing, “I think Martin Luther King, Jr. would agree with me if he were alive today that if African Americans had been given the right to keep and bear arms from day one of the country’s founding, perhaps slavery might not have been a chapter in our history.”  Larry Ward, gun nut

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Does Hobby Lobby go to church?

Hobby Lobby founder contests Obamacare contraception mandate claiming it violates he religious convictions. Somehow I doubt the company is a sole proprietorship or partnership. If I’m right then I’m at a loss to understand what the religious beliefs of  mere officers or stockholders have to do with the corporate “person” (hat tip to Mitt). On the other hand, the Supreme Court has ruled corporations have the First Amendment right to free speech so maybe they can have the right of religious liberty too.

Obama nixes Death Star

In yet another sign Obama is dangerously soft on national defense, his administration announced it would not build a Death Star despite the popular clamor. Even more shocking was the President’s rejection of destroying enemy planets, giving our other worldly enemies aid and comfort.

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Gun nut loses right to carry concealed weapon after exercising his right to free speech.

I don’t like gun nuts and I believe in strict regulation of firearms, including banning assault rifles and oversixed magazines. Despite those beliefs, I find it outrageous that my home state of Tennessee revoked James Yeager’s permit to cary a concealed weapon because of  his statement calling for other gun nuts to lcck & load to be ready to combat federal gun control. Its fashionable these days for gun advocates to claim one of the justifications for the Second Amendment is for citizens to be able to go to war with a tyrannical government. Tennessee has more than its share of such true believers. What Yeager said, while ugly, surely falls under the First Amendment’s protection. If I’m right then I don’t see how his right to carry can be curbed.

Update: It appears, from this blog post, that Yeager violated Tennessee’s constitutional ban on dueling.

Libertarian promises to have no contact with traitors who voted for Obama.

Eric Dondero, a passionate libertarian and Obama hater, is promising to shun forever all Democrats and Obama voters, even those who are part of his family:

  I’m choosing another rather unique path; a personal boycott, if you will. Starting early this morning, I am going to un-friend every single individual on Facebook who voted for Obama, or I even suspect may have Democrat leanings. I will do the same in person. All family and friends, even close family and friends, who I know to be Democrats are hereby dead to me. I vow never to speak to them again for the rest of my life, or have any communications with them. They are in short, the enemies of liberty. They deserve nothing less than hatred and utter contempt.

If only every wingnut would follow the same policy I wouldn’t be forced to listen to their harangues against Obama’s attempt to destroy America with Sharia law, gun bans, or the destruction of  Christianity.

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The rich are getting richer and the poor poorer – even in Monopoly. 

The iconic game is dumping one of its working class tokens – thimble, iron, boot or the wheelbarrow. The upper crust tokens – battleship, top hat, scottie dog, and the race car are untouchable. Next thing you know players will have to pass a credit check to get in the game.

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For photo credit click on each image – all subject to this creative commons license

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Flagrante Delicto!

Posted in erotic, FLICKR, memoir, photographers, PHOTOGRAPHY, sexual, Sexy, tennessee, Uncategorized, women with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 3, 2012 by cliffmichaels

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I didn’t decide to go to law school until I was a senior in college. Up till then my career plans were as vague as a foggy mountain winter dawn. I realized I had to do something, you know, to make an actual living. I didn’t know much of practical use at 21, but I had a pretty strong hunch a liberal arts degree wasn’t going to get me a good job, especially in the weak economy of 1970.

By the end of the summer of that year I did have a wife –  a wife who worked and, even better yet, a wife who was willing to continue working if I decided to forgo regular, full-time employment to continue going to school. This good fortune, however, was counter balanced by the shocking unwillingness of my parents to continue supporting me in the modest circumstances to which I had become accustomed. Something about good money after bad, they claimed.

I had a part time job, too. I worked a three hour late night shift at United Parcel Service. Virtually the entire nightshift crew was college students. The work wasn’t horribly hard and, for that time, it paid a decent wage. It also helped that in those bygone days tuition at the University of Tennessee was quite modest for instate students and I would not be forced into debt as students are today.

So, with a working wife, a part time job, no real debts, and not needing much ready cash to continue my education, I decided to try law school in the spring. I wasn’t worried about getting in; 1971 was well before everyone, all his siblings, most of his first cousins, (and many of his second) was besieging every law school in America and clamoring for admission. I aced the LSAT, then wasted a month or so before school started.

The first quarter I took the curriculum seriously. I studied hard, spending hours and hours in the law library (we had something called books back then). Despite working part time late at night and having early morning classes, at the end of those first three months I had one of the highest GPA’s in the class. I felt so proud of myself! Wow, I thought, I must be really good at this stuff!

Of course, once I realized law courses weren’t all that hard (no math, after all), my dedication to study soon atrophied, as did my GPA. I didn’t care. I knew I was still good at this stuff. I mean, when was the last time you asked your lawyer, doctor, accountant, or plumber what her GPA was in school?

Looking back, my legal career now seems as if it was inevitable – like Custer’s Last Stand, the sinking of the Titanic or the explosion of the Hindenburg (only without all the press attention). Now, after thirty-eight years fiddling third violin in the back row of the frequently dischordant legal orchestra, I am now  resigned to never becoming the soloist out front.

But, by God, I’m still good at it…

I’ve only recently realized I was, at birth, fated to practice law – it was inevitable! The signs were all there. And those signs continued to appear over the next twenty-one year! If I had only paid attention to them I’d be a high income plumber today!

First, I was late to my own birth. I hung around in that cozy uterus for as long as I could. Now I don’t know a lawyer who isn’t late, at least to court. When I was in my early days of practice, there was a Knoxville lawyer I admired, Joe Levitt, who was known, particularly by judges he practiced before, as the late Mr. Levitt. He had a habit of arriving to the courtroom an hour or two after his case was called, wearing a brown rumpled suit and carrying his battered brief case in one hand and a half eaten sandwich in the other.  Sadly, now that appellation is literally true. Of course, if I had been really late for my grand entry to this world, say weeks instead of days, I’d be a judge by now.

After I was born I whined and complained to both my parents. Not understanding the justice of my demands, they seemed callous judges. I thereafter learned to talk and by two I could say habeas corpus, caveat emptor, ipso facto, and coitus interruptus. It was only years into my law practice, however, I learned, and truly understood, the phrase vigilantibus non dormientibus aequitas subvenit. 

 In another obvious sign, when I was about ten or so I developed an absolute aversion to any kind of physical labor. That year my Pater familias wanted me to cut the grassIn the summmer heat! This was long before we had either a self-propelled or ride on mower. We had a stubborn push mower and a large, moderately hilly yard. It took almost an hour to do the entire job; when I was done I felt like Lawrence of Arabia deep in Wadi Rum, but not as well dressed.

I honed my verbal skills to convince Dad to excuse me from my agrostological chore. It was easy. He was an engineer and knew only three things: water flows downhill, you can’t push a rope, and you get paid twice a month. Of course, I was aided in my brief by the the mere existence of my youngest brother Pat, now old enough to assume my duties. I assured him cutting the grass would be a promotion for him, several steps up from emptying the trash. But he balked. Luckily for me, his only skill at argument to counter my suggestion to Dad he replace me was his ability to stomp his foot, shake his head and moan, “Jeez, Dad, its not fair”, a modus operandi our parents had long before learned to ignore.

Perhaps the surest sign of my future vocation came in 1962, when I was fourteen. The summer before beginning high school,  I engaged in my first serious debate. The venue was our neighbors’ front yard one late summer afternoon; my adversary was Donna, their pretty fourteen year old red headed daughter. Our audience was a handful of other neighborhood children. The subject of our debate, chosen by me, was female genital anatomy.  Although I had no sisters, after having avidly studied my parents’ 1945 plain black jacketed marriage manual and its copious, if sadly schematic, black and white anatomical drawings, I felt fully prepared and confidently argued to this girl she was clearly wrong about what lay between her own two legs. My arguments were cogent, logical, and, if I do say so myself, elegant in both composition and presentation – yet shockingly proved futile. Declaring me guilty of argumentum ad ignoratiam, she remained unyielding in the face of my attempts to seduce her with my tongue to the truth.  Still, anyone who watched our great debate would have surely concluded by the last light of the day I was destined to excel at the law.

My only regret other than my inability to convince Donna of the theoretical soundness of my position was my failure to demand she allow me to fully discover her demonstrable proof she claimed supported her position before starting the debate (it was nearly another fours years before similar discovery came to hand for close and frequent study and my juvenile erratum were at last revealed to me).

Of course, if I had actually convinced Donna what she saw in her hand mirror when she examined her nether regions was wrong, I would not only be a lawyer today, but a very, very, very rich one as well…

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Dear reader, should you think ill of my tales, or doubt their veracity, I urge you to recall this Latin phrase:

Dubia in meliorem partem interpretari debent

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For photo credits, click an image. All images, and my remixes, subject to this creative commons license

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Tits & Spittle

Posted in erotic, FLICKR, history, photographers, PHOTOGRAPHY, pinup, Sexy, women with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 19, 2012 by cliffmichaels

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Sorry, but it’s time for another one of my dismal, tiresome political rants. I’ve tried for days to resist but I find myself at last overwhelmed by my baser liberal, left-wing, godless, bleeding heart, moonbat emotions. As a paltry recompense I’ve included a few decent titty shots along the way. Enjoy the text, the mindless smut, or both…

 

I’m mad enough to spit!!!

Paul Ryan? Really? Paul Ryan!?? You’re kidding me. At this point I planned to make a joke, but realized I couldn’t hold a candle to Bill Maher, Jon Stewart, Jay Leno, or Steven Colbert, so forget it. Besides, for the country, Paul Ryan is no joke. A nightmare, maybe – but no joke.

OK, yeah, I’m a nearly fossilized sixties’ liberal (I would have been a sixties’ radical, but that seemed like too much work and dangerous to my future health and welfare). I came of age during what was, in retrospect, the last great age of liberal accomplishment: Medicare, Medicare, civil rights, the success of the anti-war movement, the birth and rise of the women’s movement and reproductive freedom. Liberalism was surging forward like an irresistible tide and I believed that tide would continue far into the future.

How wrong I was! Almost sixty years later that progressive tide has ebbed; liberal accomplishments, even those of a hundred  or more years of age, are facing erosion from cold, corrosive conservative currents. Even the very core of the New Deal, Social Security, is buffeted by the reactionary undertow. Paul Ryan, seen as a serious voice for fiscal sanity, seeks to reform both social security and Medicare and slashing federal spending. We just can’t afford not to, he tells us. The future of our nation itself is at stake! He’s such a principled budget cutter – just ask the mainstream pundits ( except of course when it comes to outlays for defense or the need for new revenue, and the promotion of Bush’s wars, tax cuts and entitlement programs).

Who would have ever thought, even twenty years ago, that the 17th Amendment to the Constitution, passed in 1913, would come under attack from mainstream Republicans? Animosity to the amendment mandating popular election of senators is no longer confined to the fringe of the conservative movement. Several current Republican candidates for the Senate espouse or support repeal. More alarming, no serious Republican has gone on the record countering the growing move for repeal.

The argument against the dubious 17th seems to be its passage undermined the Founders’ grand scheme of federalism by depriving state legislatures of their original Constitutional power to choose senators. By stripping states of that power, the amendment crippled state sovereignty.

The amendment was passed in the face of rampant corruption. Think politics are shady today? Our age seems pristine compared to the politics of the Gilded Age. Imagine a state legislature, in which a relative handful of politicians, can pick two of a hundred senators; and imagine senators whose only real constituent is that handful. If you think today’s corruption – including outright bribery – is less likely just think Rod Blagojevich (imagine your state legislature with a few score Rod Blagoieviches on the make).

Returning to legislative election of  senators would save corporations, and other special interests, tons of money. Instead of having to pour millions upon millions into thirty-three senate campaigns every two years, they would merely have to cough up sufficient political donations to satisfy a few hundred  greedy pols. Even better, this sort of campaigning could be kept entirely confidential. What the people don’t know can’t hurt them…

I wonder when we will hear the first Republican long for the days when only white male property owners could vote. Seems to me the restricted franchise was a part of federalism too. Why should the unwashed, teeming rabble who have  no real stake in the serious business of government be permitted to dilute their betters’ franchise? Shouldn’t determining qualifications for voters be entirely returned to the sovereign states?

And wouldn’t a real conservative federalist want to repeal the 14th Amendment as well as the 17th? After all, nothing did more to shatter the Founders’ original scheme than imposing the burden of compelling states to respect federal personal rights. Our Founding Fathers never intended, for example, the Bill of Rights to apply to the states. Only the 14th, and the meddling of the Supreme Court, caused such a disturbance in the Scheme of Things. Why shouldn’t the Mormons, for example, be able to establish their religion in the sovereign state of Utah?

Of course, let’s not even discuss the 16th Amendment. Is anything more inimical to liberty than the IRS?

When I came of age in that distant progressive age states were seen as nearly irrelevant and subservient to the federal government. The argument for states’ rights was largely discredited by its adoption by southern racists resisting the crusade for civil rights. The then existing broad scope of the commerce clause allowed the federal government to control virtually every economic and political sphere.

Now we have a Supreme Court together with a conservative movement,  seemingly bent on undoing seventy years of precedent. When lawsuits were first filed against Obamacare based upon an argument Congress could not justify its adoption on the commerce clause the overwhelming consensus in the legal community was such an argument was clearly without merit. A majority of the Court, however,  disagreed and cast an ominous pall over federal powers scrutinized by the Court in the future.

I was in something of a political argument with an acquaintance a few months ago. I jokingly asked him if he would give his life to defend Tennessee, thinking the obvious answer was no. I was wrong; the fellow declared he’d gladly die to save our Volunteer state. I was totally nonplussed. To me it seemed as ridiculous to die for Tennessee as it would to give my life for my county or city (I only regret I have but one life to give for my municipality!

Paul Ryan, and perhaps Mitt Romney (who knows what he really believes) are part of the forces seeking to return American to the Nineteenth Century. Perhaps they genuinely believe our country was a better, freer place in 1900. At that time the United States was indifferent to the clamor of women, blacks, workers, immigrants, and other misfits, for political rights and powers. It took the Roosevelt cousins, and the shock of the Great Depression, to shake things up and give the federal government broad powers to promote the general welfare.

Some cynics, myself included, doubt the sincerity of Paul Ryan and his ilk. Like their racist predecessors, I think modern conservatives’ advocacy of state’s rights and fiscal austerity  merely a cloak to conceal their true interests.

That’s what I think and it makes me mad enough to spit!!!

Except for small header, photos above by Shawn Perez, subject to this creative common license

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IGNORE THIS POST!

Posted in FLICKR, politics, religion, satire with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 7, 2012 by cliffmichaels

My second cousin Wesley G. Worthliston, III, had his right wing blog Absolutely Right wiped out by a severe rat infestation at the server farm hosting his blog. Out of family loyalty I reluctantly allowed him to post to Visions. His site should be back and running late today…

Andrew Breitbart, RIP

First, I  suppose I should thank cousin Cliff for “allowing” me to post here on his dubious and disgusting blog. He left  out that my dad, the Big Two as he’s called in family circles, a big time hedge fund manager, had to exert considerable financial pressure to get Cliff to do the Right Thing. His omission of that fact is a typical example of liberal sneakiness…

In any event, here’s the Saturday morning roundup…

Scalia’s shocking revelation of the Obama Administration’s secret plot to force broccoli onto every American family’s dinner table has apparently stopped the plan in its green & gruesome  tracks. We must remain vigilant, however; there are credible rumors the government is thinking of mandating that arugula be added to nursing home lunchplates.

Should copies of the  koran carry warning labels?

Kudo’s to SCOTUS for allowing strip searches. The idea now needs to be expanded to applicants for food stamps and unemployment brenefits (at least to those socialist programs are eliminated). Oh, adding women seeking to kill their unborn kids to the mix wouldn’t be a bad idea either!

Has Rush sold out?

Romny’s support for a budget plan that only provides for a modest increase in defense  spending and relatively small decrease in job creators’ tax rates is just another outrageous example of his liberal Taxachusettes views. What we really need is a total elimination of taxes on the top two percent of the population until the Obama recession is clearly over (and then a gradual increase to  maximum tax rate of four or five percent with tax free capital gains). On defense spending, the need for a twenty percent plus percent increase is painfully obvious. Until our defense budget substantially exceeds the rest of the world’s nations’  military expenditures combined we aren’t truly safe.   How to pay for it?  Duh! Root out those socialist giveaways Social Security, Medicare,  and Medicaid!

 Should Iraq become an American territory like Guam?

Nuclear weapons could be the answer to the Iran question…  I suppose for appearance’s sake we should reserve the nukes at first. While I don’t personally agree, I grant the case for exempting Tehran as a target.

An Obama victory in November will be a sure sign of massive voter fraud. The plan to post militia members at “minorty” polling stations in blue states enjoys growing support. I oppose the effort to arm militia members with automatic weapons – small arms should be enough to discourage fraud (unless, of course, Obama’s so called “Justice” department attempts to intervene).

Is Osama really dead?

Thank God Obama failed in his attempt to exterminate innocent civilians in Virginia. Sending a F-18 crashing down onto a defenseless retirement village is merely another example of the muslim Kenyan born fascist’s war on older Americans. Don’t be fooled by the lap dog socialist press’s attempt to call the assault on the elderly an “accident”. Our valiant military is far to good to have one of its first line fighters crash in a residential area. Obama’s vile attack was only foiled by his utter incompetence.

Should labor unions be prosecuted as criminal conspiracies?

Finally, Monday, when hopefully my blog will be back, I’ll be posting two great articles: Should Income Taxes be Voluntary? and Don’t Impeach Obama, Deport Him!

Oh, and I want to make it very clear I am NOT responsible for any pornographic photos posted on this page!

Photo by Unalienable Rights…, subject to this creative commons license

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When I was Almost Famous Long Ago…

Posted in FLICKR, memoir, photographers, PHOTOGRAPHY, tennessee with tags , , , , , , , , on April 6, 2012 by cliffmichaels

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Once upon a time I was famous. Well, not very famous, but just enough to claim I was. I was on  Nightline and countless other TV and radio shows. My client and I were flown – free! –  to Melbourne to appear on a national television program. Reporters hung on my every word and then distorted them.

Caroline Kennedy – yes, that Caroline Kennedy – traveled from New York to interview me for a book she was writing. I was on a first name basis with reporters for the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal. Sally Jessie and Maury wanted me to be on their shows.

Why was I almost famous? A once in a lifetime case fell at my feet. All I had to do pick it up and run with it. Three years of delightful legal fun and games with sweet victory at the end of the day. At the trial the courtroom was packed with reporters clacking away on their laptops every time I spoke. At every recess I was surrounded by a scrum of cameras and microphones. The next morning I could read about me – well, actually, my case – in national and local newspapers.  No doubt about it, I was a reasonably large big shot.

After the trial (which, in the scheme of things, was really pointless since the case involved a purely legal issue) my fame began to wane. No more frantic calls from the network morning shows, no more limos coming to my house to whisk me to the local studios. I still got calls to be a radio guest or to give my comments to a newspaper for a feature piece, but the bright lights were mostly gone.

By the end of 1993 I had sunk into obscurity. I was back to being just another  small town lawyer and nothing more.  The overwhelming majority of my cases were mindlessly routine: divorces, petty criminal cases, and a handful of collection cases.

But I’ve had the pale consolation of my memories of those fifteen minutes. And if you give me half a chance I’ll tell you all about it till you faint from boredom!

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